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05/14/2020Shopify beats TCPA suit
01/15/2020Shopify now doing startup loans
04/30/2019Shopify issued $87.8M in MCAs in Q1
04/30/2019Shopify goes into brick & mortar market
03/25/2019Square takes on Shopify



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Shopify Releases 3 Years of Shopping Trends: 1 Million Merchants Say Pandemic Purchases New Normal

December 14, 2020
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future of commerceShopify released a treasure trove of data from customer surveys collected in the past three years. The firm reached a milestone of 1 million businesses using their platforms this year. The data Shopify gathered paints an accurate portrait of a dramatically going-digital world.

“2020 has accelerated the industry by a decade, permanently altering the way entrepreneurs start, run, and grow businesses, as well as how consumers choose to shop and pay,” President of Shopify, Harley Finkelstein, said in an introduction. “Consider this report your crystal ball into the future of this industry.”

Finkelstein put forth five key predictions based on the trends Shopify found in the data. Be prepared, Finkelstein warns, for a new generation of retailers and consumers to forever change the world of commerce.

Key prediction one: Young consumers will change the business landscape as eCommerce charges ahead. Shopify predicts that younger shoppers changing their habits due to the pandemic will likely shop this way from now on. 67% of shoppers under 35 shifted to shopping online, compared to 57% of the 35-55 bracket.

Overall, 84% shopped online this year, compared to 65% in person. 53% of those that shopped online did so because they wanted to avoid crowds, 46% of consumers felt uncomfortable shopping in person.

Key two: Physical retail is transforming, giving local businesses new advantages. Consumer reports showed 62% of people prefer contactless purchases for in-store purchasing in 2020, an increase of 122% during the pandemic. Go figure. 94% of the point-of-sale retail lost in the first six weeks of shutdowns was replaced with online sales.

Key three: Consumers want to shop independently but are not. Businesses will adapt to make it easier to buy from a small business. Half of the consumers look for independent business owners, while 65% say they support small businesses. It turns out that only 29% of consumers shopped at a small business during the pandemic, giving ground to findings that small business is having trouble adapting to online-only commerce compared to larger chains.

Independent retailers need to make customers put their money where their mouth is. Shopify said that fast and free shipping could help. 59% of online shoppers say free delivery would improve their online shopping. 75% of merchants who generated sales in March through September did so with free shipping options on their site.

Key Four: Consumers will vote with their wallets. 53% prefer environmentally sustainable products, and 49% want the retailer to donate proceeds to charity when they make a purchase. The fourth of consumers that did buy local this year did so to support their community and local economy and create jobs.

Finally, our favorite, Key Five: Modern financial solutions will disrupt business and consumer banking finance and lending. Shopify found evidence for growth in their merchant financial platforms. 24% that applied for financing agreed with the 36% that faced problems from COVID-19 by stating: “My bank or financial institution does understand the needs of my business.”

The quality of user experience plays a massive factor for merchants; accordingly, 48% say “a good online bank or mobile app experience” is a top-three feature, while 62% of marketplace sellers say the same.

The findings conclude that explaining the trends was shared to encourage businesses to use the info to adapt and change, as they have been the past year.

Become Releases a New Shopify App – Beprofit, to Expand Its Offerings to the E-Commerce Market

November 25, 2020
Article by:

Leading fintech startup Become pivots to new territory as it expands its service offerings to Shopify apps with a new profit tool.

beprofitTel Aviv, Israel – November 25, 2020 – Become, the leading online platform for small and medium businesses to find and optimize their funding solutions, announced today it has released a new Shopify app offering ‘BeProfit’.

With the expansion of the ecommerce landscape in light of the coronavirus, Become noticed the need for a single intuitive dashboard that ecommerce sellers can use to track and manage their profit and expenses. With BeProfit, Shopify sellers across the globe can now trace their profits in real time and discover what areas of their business they can optimize to increase their bottom line.

“Creating BeProfit has been a big part of our ‘pivot strategy’ during COVID-19. Building a Shopify app is a totally new and exciting realm for Become,” said Eden Amirav, CEO and Co-founder of Become. “Although offbeat, BeProfit falls in line with our underlying mission – to create a better world of funding for businesses and essentially help business owners become more. Being more profitable is not only something all businesses aspire to achieve but it is also something that will make a business become more fundable down the line.”

With many e-commerce sellers struggling to calculate, map and understand their profits, BeProfit calculates and organizes everything for them in a process that takes a matter of minutes. The app enables sellers to know exactly how much they’re making and spending, and more importantly on what. The dashboard integrates with a number of external sources, such as shipping service providers, external marketing platforms, and payment processors. This results in both visual and dynamic financial reports that update in real-time.

Noam Sinansky, CEO and Co-founder of Spire Jewelry – one of BeProfit’s first users said it’s “the first app that really manages to put in order all the financial information of my store! The app helped me get rid of complicated excel files, it just displays the information in a convenient, simple, and accurate way.”

To learn more about BeProfit, visit apps.shopify.com/beprofit-profit-tracker

About Become

Become, is the leading online platform for SMBs to find and optimize their funding solutions. The company uses its proprietary technology to nurture each business throughout the funding cycle. Become is rapidly growing with near 200,000 loyal business owners registered through its platform. The company has built an ecosystem of more than 50 leading lenders and partners and has facilitated over $285 million in tailored business loans to date.

Become’s latest service is a Shopify App “BeProfit”, organizes complex data into an intuitive and interactive dashboard. Shopify sellers can easily track their profit and expenses to see which areas of their business needs improving in order to become more profitable.

Become is backed by Benson Oak Ventures, Magenta Venture, Viola Credit, RIO Ventures Holdings, Entrée Capital and iAngels. The company has offices in San Francisco and Tel Aviv. For more information, visit: become.co.

Media Contact
Amit Shalgi
shalgi@become.co
+972547331141

Shopify Capital Originated $252M in MCAs and Business Loans in Q3

October 29, 2020
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shopify glyphShopify Capital, the finance arm of the 2nd largest e-commerce platform in the United States, reported making $252.1M worth of merchant cash advances and loans in the 3rd quarter. This is a 79% increase over the same period last year and spans three markets, the US, UK, and Canada. It’s also a quarterly record for the company.

The figure also solidly trumped the numbers recently reported by rival OnDeck.

Shopify CFO Amy Shapero said that the company has maintained loss ratios in line with historical performance.

“Businesses need financial resources to survive and fulfill their potential especially in these uncertain times and as you heard just now capital greatly increases the value of Shopify to our merchants,” she said during the earnings call.

Square, Stripe, Intuit, Shopify, Talked SMB Lending at LendIt Fintech 2020

October 8, 2020
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LenditFintech USAThe LendIt Fintech digital conference last week was a sign of the times. This year, millions of average businesses and consumers have had to go virtual: they had no choice. 2020 has been a year of struggle and survival, and a time of great fintech adoption.

Some firms have been more successful than others. Going full digital, LendIt introduced virtual networking at the conference- the first day alone saw 2,171 meetings. Zoom meetings and virtual greetings took the place of handshakes and elevator pitches that would regularly accompany the convention.

On day three, LendIt hosted a panel of SMB lending leaders from Stripe, Shopify, Square, and Quickbooks Capital. Bryan Lee, Senior Director of Financial Services for Salesforce, served as moderator and he focused the discussion on “How the leading fintech brands are adapting.”


THE PIVOT


Lee began the talk by asking Eddie Serrill, Business Lead from Stripe Capital, about how the industry has pivoted.

Serrill talked about how Stripe was powering online interactions and saw an influx of traditionally offline businesses switching over to their platforms. Stripe also saw an increased demand for online purchases and payment.

“We’ve been trying to find that right balance between supporting users that have been doing incredibly well,” Serrill said. “While trying to support our users who are seeing a bit of a setback.”

Stripe introduced a lending product in September of last year and now SMBs can borrow from Stripe and pay back by diverting a percentage of their sales, much like the other panelists’ companies offer.

Jessica Jiang, Head of Capital Markets at Square Capital, talked about how her firm adjusted. Square reacted to fill the niche of their underserved customers by introducing a main street lending fund, serving industries hard hit by the pandemic, Jiang said. Small buinesess that relied on in-person action like coffee shops and retail community businesses were given preferential lending options.

Product Lead at Shopify, Richard Shaw, said that this year his firm learned to be prepared for anything. Everything that Shopify was potentially going to do or planning on implementing in the coming years suddenly became a here-and-now necessity.

“We tore up our existing plans,” Shaw said. “It was like the commerce world of 2030 turned up in 2020. You need to do ten years of work, but you need to do it today.”

Shopify, the Canadian e-commerce giant has doubled in value this year. The firm launched Shopify Capital in the US and Canada in 2016 and has originated $1.2 billion in funding to small businesses since that time.

Luke Voiles, the VP of Intuits QuickBooks Capital, talked about how his team handled pandemic conservatively.

“Five years of digital shift has happened instantaneously due to COVID,” Voiles said. “Intuit is pretty recession-resistant in the sense that you have to do taxes, you have to do your accounting, and the shift to digital helps a lot.”

Business lending was different, Voiles said, as soon as his team saw COVID coming, they battened down the hatches, slowed lending, and pivoted to facilitating PPP.


PPP


Voiles said the craziest thing he has seen in his career was what Quickbooks did to deploy PPP aid.

Within about two weeks, almost 500 people from across Intuit came together to shift all the data they carried on customers to aid applications.

“We were uniquely positioned to help solve and deploy that capital,” Voiles said. “We have a payroll business where 1.4 billion business use us, we have a tax business where we have Schedule C tax filings, and we have a lending business. We were able to pivot and put the pieces together quickly.”

QuickBooks Capital deployed $1.2 billion to 31,000 business in a process that Voiles said was 90% automated. Now customers are awaiting other rounds of government aid.

Square’s Jiang said the initial shutdown weeks in March and April saw hundreds of Square team members working on PPP facilitation through the night and weekends. As the funds dried up those first two weeks, it was clear to Jiang the program was favoring larger firms and higher loan amounts, leaving out small businesses.

“That’s typical of investment bankers, but not very typical of tech,” Jiang said. “PPP is a perfect example of how small businesses are continuing to be underserved by banks.”


THE SHAKEOUT AND THE FUTURE


2020 has been a major shock to the lending marketplace. Voiles from Quickbooks said the amount of work it took to make it through the first wave was a significant shakeout.

“You’ve seen what’s happening with Kabbage and OnDeck and other transactions with people getting sold; there is a shakeout happening in the space,” Voiles said. “The bigger players will make it through and will continue to help small businesses get access to capital that they need.”

When asked about the future roadmap of QuickBooks Capital, Voiles said it wasn’t just about automating banking. Using Intuit’s resources to build an automated system is only half of the picture- the firm believes in an expert-driven platform. After the automated process, customers will be able to talk to an expert to review the data, and “check their work.” Voiles said Quickbooks wants to offer a service that is equivalent to the replacement of a CFO.

“These small businesses that have less than ten employees, they can’t afford to hire a pro,” Voiles said. “They need automated support to show them the dashboard and picture of what their business is.”

Pointing to Stripe’s online infrastructure, Serrill exemplified what successful lenders will offer next year: a platform that combines many needs of SMBs in one place.

“I think it’s really about linking all of this data, making it super intuitive and anticipating the need for their users, so they don’t need a team of business school grads to manage their finances,” Serrill said. “So they can get back to building the core of their business, not figuring out whether they have enough cash flow tomorrow.”

Jiang said the future of small business would be written in data, contactless payments, and digital banking. She sees consolidation in the Fintech space and has a positive outlook on bank-fintech partnerships.

The FDIC granted Square a conditional approval for the issuance of an Industrial Loan Company ILC in March this year. Jiang outlined plans on launching an online SMB lending and banking service next year called Square Financial Services if the conditional charter remains in place.

For Shopify’s future, Shaw was excited to look forward to the launching of Shopify balance- a cash flow management system, and Shopify installment payments. He reiterated that the success of Shopify’s lending division was due in part because making loans was not the entire business.

“Shopify Capital is one piece of a wider ecosystem,” Shaw said. “All these things together are more powerful than individual parts.”

Shopify Originates $153M in MCAs and Loans in Q2

July 29, 2020
Article by:

shopify glyphShopify had a monster 2nd quarter. The e-commerce giant generated $36M in profit on $714.3M in revenue. As part of that the company originated $153 million worth of loans and merchant cash advances, only slightly down from the $162.4M in Q1. Still that figure was up by 65% year-over-year (and was more than 2x the volume originated by OnDeck).

The company has offered capital to its US merchants since 2016 and recently begun doing the same with its UK and Canadian merchants starting this past March and April respectively, the company revealed.

Shopify CFO Amy Shapero said that company had maintained loss ratios “in line with historical periods,” despite COVID. “Access to capital is even tougher in times like these, which makes it even more important to continue lowering this barrier by making it quick and easy so merchants can focus on growing their business,” Shapero stated.

Shopify Shows Strength in Q1 Results, Issues $162.4M in MCAs and Loans

May 6, 2020
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eCommerce platform Shopify, 2nd only to Amazon in retail eCommerce sales, issued $162.4M in merchant cash advances and business loans in Q1, up from $115.9M in the previous quarter. The statistic pushed them past the $1 billion threshold of funds cumulatively issued since inception.

The company’s provision and allowance for loan losses ticked up from significantly from the same period the prior year but Shopify at that time was originating 50% less volume.

Shopify 1

Shopify 2

The company reported a GAAP net loss of $31.4M on $470M in revenue. Shopify also has approximately $2.36B in cash and cash equivalents on its balance sheet.

The company reported an increase of monthly recurring revenue, thanks to an increase in the number of merchants joining the platform, strong app growth, and Shopify Plus fee revenue growth.

Shares of Shopify (NYSE: Shop) jumped by more than 5% after the announcement.

Shopify Capital Originated $430 Million in Loans and MCAs in 2019

February 17, 2020
Article by:

shopify glyphShopify Capital, the e-commerce giant’s small business financing arm, originated $430 million in funding through loans and merchant cash advances in 2019. Shopify now has more than 1 million e-commerce merchants on its platform, the company says. Earlier in the year the company began rolling out funding to merchants that are not using its payment service.

Though 2019 year-end reporting for the industry is still sparse, the company’s origination figures will likely cause Shopify to move up the rankings maintained by deBanked.

PayPal, who deBanked predicts will keep its #1 spot, did not disclose its annual origination figures in its already-reported Q4 earnings.

Shopify Capital Originated $141M Of Loans And MCAs In Q3, Says It’s a Meaningful Part Of The Shopify Business

October 29, 2019
Article by:

shopify glyphShopify Capital, Shopify’s small business funding division, originated $141 million in loans and merchant cash advances last quarter, an 85% increase over Q3 last year.

The company has now cumulatively originated $768.9M since it began funding in April 2016.

On the earnings call, Shopify COO Harley Finkelstein commented on the company’s recent initiative to fund non-Shopify payment merchants by saying that “while it’s still early, we’re seeing strong adoption from those merchants.”

“We started Shopify Capital to help solve another playing field for entrepreneurs, access to capital to grow their businesses,” he explained. “This is especially true as merchants gear up for their busiest selling season of the year.”

When asked about how funding would play a role in the company’s long term expansion and retention plans, Finkelstein said the following:

[P]art of this is making sure that we have merchants in the entirety of their journey to success, certainly things like having additional cash for things like inventory and marketing are very important to them. And there’s not too many place to get that with capital. So we think we’re helping merchants by doing this. It also serves of course as a way to retain merchants because we’re not only now their e-commerce platform or the point sale provider or the payments provider, we’re also now in some cases playing the role of their capital provider.

So this is a meaningful part of our business, and it keeps growing, and it’s certainly something we’re very proud of. And in terms of managing the risk, it’s something we keep a close eye on. We do a ton of trade forecasting and ensuring that we look at the data to update our models as we see trends changing. That being said, it’s important to remember that most of the capital that we put out there is insured by our partner EDC.

So we think that we continue to grow the capital business at the same time manage the risk and so we’re not doing anything that is outside of that loss ratio and risk exposure comfort zone that we think we have right now.

Shopify CEO Tobi Lutke later added how their Capital division adds to their Gross Merchandise Value (GMV) because merchants use funds to build their businesses.”What happens is a lot more businesses, that otherwise would not have access to loans get them and therefore actually continue building their business.”



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